Saturday, May 29, 2010

Alicia Keys pregnant.


Alicia Keys is in a motherhood state of mind: She's pregnant with her first child.
The Grammy Award-winning R&B singer has been dating producer Swizz Beatz, who has written hits for Beyonce (bee-AHN'-say), Jay-Z and others. They're engaged to be married at a private ceremony later this year.

Representatives for the couple confirmed the news Thursday night.
Keys last year teamed up with Jay-Z for a hit song about New York called "Empire State of Mind." She's among a string of international artists slated to perform at a June 10 concert to mark the start of the World Cup soccer tournament in South Africa.
Beatz has been married before and has two sons.

Friday, May 21, 2010

wanasayansi waonywa wasimchezee Mungu- Kutoka Italy

ROME – Catholic Church officials said Friday the recent creation by researchers of the first synthetic cell can be a positive development if correctly used, but warned scientists that only God can create life.

Vatican and Italian church officials were mostly cautious in their first reaction to the announcement from the United States that researchers had produced a living cell powered by manmade DNA. They warned scientists of the ethical responsibility of scientific progress and said that the manner in which the innovation is applied in the future will be crucial.
"If it is used toward the good, to treat pathologies, we can only be positive" in our assessment, Monsignor Rino Fisichella, the Vatican's top bioethics official, told state-run TV. "If it turns out not to be ... useful to respect the dignity of the person, then our judgment would change."
"We look at science with great interest. But we think above all about the meaning that must be given to life," said Fisichella, who heads Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life. "We can only reach the conclusion that we need God, the origin of life."
Catholic Church teaching holds that human life is God's gift, created through natural procreation between a man and woman.
The inventors said the world's first synthetic cell is more a re-creation of existing life — changing one simple type of bacterium into another — than a built-from-scratch kind. But genome-mapping pioneer J. Craig Venter said his team's project paves the way for designing organisms that work differently from the way nature intended for a wide range of uses.
A top Italian cardinal, Angelo Bagnasco, said the invention is "further sign of intelligence, God's gift to understand creation and be able to better govern it," according to Apcom and ANSA news agencies.
"On the other hand, intelligence can never be without responsibility," said Bagnasco, the head of the Italian bishops' conference. "Any form of intelligence and any scientific acquisition ... must always be measured against the ethical dimension, which has at its heart the true dignity of every person."
Another official with the Italian bishops' conference, Bishop Domenico Mogavero, expressed concern that scientists might be tempted to play God.
"Pretending to be God and parroting his power of creation is an enormous risk that can plunge men into a barbarity," Mogavero told newspaper La Stampa in an interview. Scientists "should never forget that there is only one creator: God."
"In the wrong hands, today's development can lead tomorrow to a devastating leap in the dark," said Mogavero, who heads the conference's legal affairs department.

simple top for ladies- made in Tanzania




bazee top zinapatikana

ukizipenda toa oda at 0784 703920



Thursday, May 6, 2010

New vacancies ant Aga Khan University

The Aga Khan University Institute for Educational Development, Eastern Africa, invites applications for the following position, based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE DIRECTOR’S OFFICE
Reporting to the Director, AKU-IED EA, the appointee will be responsible for providing effective and efficient administrative and secretarial support to the Director’s Office at AKU-IED EA. His or her specific duties will include • Ensure effective and efficient functioning of the office of the Director. • Provide briefing materials to the Director, management of information flow (email, verbal, written) and follow-up on deadlines and commitments made. • Coordinate social and operational aspects of visits from official visitors to IED, and events hosted by IED (Graduation, Conferences, Seminars, Workshops) by: • Maintain liaison with external agencies (e.g. donors, visiting faculty, partners, stakeholders) to ensure efficient follow-up and information-flow. • Act as secretary to the Management Advisory Group and other committees where the Director is represented and may require assistance (note taking and transcribing, ensuring decisions made are implemented, circulation of notes and scheduling meetings). • Liaise with the Administrative Assistant Director’s office in organisation and logistics of Director’s travel. • Maintain office library and database of official contacts. • Any other duties as requested by the Director. The ideal candidate should posses a first degree in Public Administration or other related field from a recognised university and at least 3 years of secretarial experience at a senior level especially in an education setting. Other requirements include proficiency in Microsoft applications (Word, Excel, and Access) and ability to communicate effectively in both English and Kiswahili. The candidate must have excellent interpersonal and team building skills, evidence of taking initiative and a record of providing a friendly, efficient and supportive service. A diploma in secretarial skills will be an added advantage.


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Reporting to the Associate Director, Administration or nominee, the appointee will be responsible for providing effective and efficient administrative and secretarial support to the Associate Director, Administration and to Faculty at AKU-IED, EA. His or her specific duties will include.
· Scheduling of appointments and providing support on the daily tasks of supervisors (including organising documentation and resources for meetings or classes)
· Carrying out general office administration functions, which include maintaining and operating appropriate and efficient communications systems such as telephone, fax, email, mail and courier service and attending to day-to-day administrative issues
· Maintaining efficient systems to ensure all incoming and outgoing correspondence is properly received, recorded and distributed
· Maintaining efficient filing systems
· Taking minutes during meetings outlining recommendations and tasks assigned
· Liaising with the Administrative Assistants in general administration to follow-up on relevant arrangements e.g. transport or travel
· Ensuring proper travel arrangements and itineraries are made
· Maintaining task lists
· Assist with web-based and library research
· Any other duty as may be assigned by the Supervisor
The ideal candidate should hold a Bachelor’s degree in Secretarial Studies or equivalent and should have at least two years of related work experience. S/he should demonstrate initiative, strong interpersonal skills and should be proficient in the use of all MS Office applications as well as good communication skills.


ADMINISTRATION OFFICER, ACADEMIC & RESEARCH OFFICE
Reporting to the Manager, Registrarial Services and Academic Administration the incumbent will coordinate student admissions, provide general students support as well as provide support in the coordination of research activities. The following are specific duties for this position:
· Developing a data base and maintaining student records
· Coordinating students’ related visa processing activities
· Coordinating student seminars and practicum in liaison with the Programme Coordinator and collaborating schools
· In liaison with the administration office coordinating student medical as well as accommodation activities
· Participating in the planning of graduation ceremonies
· Coordinating provision of approved general stationeries, transport and other administrative support
· Assisting in the development of budgets for research, developing work plans for the same and ensuring timeliness in the completion of research activities
· Assisting in the dissemination of research and providing support to research-related committees including ERC and RAC.
· Assisting faculty members in obtaining materials/equipment related to research
· Regularly reviewing research support needs and organising support workshops e.g. writing of research proposals
· Performing any other duty that may be assigned by the supervisor
To qualify
The ideal candidate should possess a Bachelors degree in Public Administration or equivalent from a recognised university, two (2) years experience in administration especially in an education setting, excellent interpersonal and communication skills, Microsoft computer application and ability to communicate effectively in both English and in Kiswahili. Knowledge of SPSS research application will be a definite advantage.


COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER
Reporting to the Head of Administration and the Director IED, EA, the Communications Officer will play a key role in helping to develop the communications activities so as to provide effective and creative support to AKU - TIHE’s media, fundraising, advocacy and campaigning objectives, with a special remit to communicate the effectiveness and efficiency of the University’s programmes.His or her specific duties will include;
 Implementing a communications strategy and work towards raising the communications profile of AKU-TIHE
· Establishing a team that would work with other sections of the university to provide support in maintaining the intranet; and development of the AKU-TIHE website and relevant links to the general website;
· Representing the Institution in the capacity of Communications Officer in order to work towards raising the communications profile of the University in a manner that effectively positions and maintains a positive public understanding of AKU- TIHE
· Monitor and research on IEDs programmes and the main issues in which IED is engaged in order to develop high quality written and audio visual information and materials designed to maximize communication coverage.
· Work with relevant AKU personnel to develop unit-level communications strategies and implement these strategies through a number of channels, including maximising the level of media coverage and engagement.
· Develop and maintain relations with members of the media in Tanzania order to promote IEDs work as well as for other programmes in order to prepare Staff for potential media interviews as required.
· Develop and maintain relationships with staff including assisting them with the preparation of internal communication materials, presentations including materials for internal and external events such as donor visits.
· Respond in a timely and appropriate manner to media queries in Tanzania and contribute to the monitoring of media coverage relevant to the programmes operations and advocacy positions.
· Liaise with relevant AKU personnel to write effective and timely press releases on the programmes.
· Ensure the website content is up to date.
· Gather stories and case studies and reflect these in a text and/or audio visual and/or still photography formats for use in media coverage and AKU newsletters.
· Develop and manage an effective system for the programmes audio visual content.
· Assist the Regional office on ad hoc project work as agreed.
· Establish and maintain relationships with relevant stakeholders
· Any other duty as may be assigned to the Supervisor.

The ideal candidate should possess a Bachelors degree in Public Relations or other related field from a recognised University with at least 3 years working experience in a related field at a senior level, preferably in an education setting. S/he should be proficient in Microsoft applications (Word, Excel, and Access) with ability to communicate effectively in both English and Kiswahili. The candidate must have excellent interpersonal and team building skills.
Please send your application, an updated CV and testimonials, including the names, postal and e-mail addresses, telephone/fax numbers of two professional references, addressed to the Human Resources Coordinator, AKU - TIHE P.O. Box 125, Dar es Salaam; Fax (+255) (0)22 2150875 or email hr.iedea@aku.edu by May 21, 2010. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. For further information, please visit www.aku.edu



Miss Universe 2010.

Hellen dausen - Miss Universe 2010


She is natural and beautiful

The Worst Words to Say at Work

9 common words and phrases that will make you sound noncommittal, undependable, and untrustworthy



Some words and phrases are often used to buy time, avoid giving answers, and escape commitment. If you use these words and phrases yourself, take a scalpel and cut them out of your thinking, speaking, and writing.
"Try"
"Try" is a weasel word. "Well, I'll try," some people say. It's a cop-out. They're just giving you lip service, when they probably have no real intention of doing what you ask. Remember what Yoda says to Luke Skywalker in "Star Wars": "Do or do not--there is no try." Take Yoda's advice. Give it your all when you do something. And if it doesn't work, start over.
Put passion into your work, and give it your best effort, so you can know that you did all you could to make it happen. So if the outcome you were expecting didn't come to fruition, it's not because you didn't do everything you could to make it happen. It just wasn't the right time for it or it wasn't meant to be.
"Whatever"
This word is a trusted favorite of people who want to dismiss you, diminish what you say, or get rid of you quickly. "Whatever," they will say as an all-purpose response to your earnest request. It's an insult and a verbal slap in the face. It's a way to respond to a person without actually responding. When you say "whatever" after another person has said his or her piece, you have essentially put up a wall between the two of you and halted any progress in communicating. It's a word to avoid.
"Maybe" and "I don't know"
People will sometimes avoid making a decision--and hide behind words and phrases like "maybe" and "I don't know." There's a difference between legitimately not knowing something and using words like these as excuses. Sometimes during a confrontation, people will claim not to know something or offer the noncommittal response "maybe," just to avoid being put on the spot. If that seems to be the case, ask, "When do you think you will know?" or "How can you find out?" Don't let the person off the hook so easily.
"I'll get back to you"
When people need to buy time or avoid revealing a project's status, they will say, "I'll get back to you," and they usually never do. If people say they will get back to you, always clarify. Ask them when they will get back to you, and make sure they specify the day and time. If they don't, then pin them down to a day and time and hold them to it. If they won't give you a day or time, tell them you'll call in a day or week and follow up. Make sure you call and get the information you need.
"If"
Projects depend on everyone doing his or her part. People who use "if" are usually playing the blame game and betting against themselves. They like to set conditions, rather than assuming a successful outcome. People who rely on conditional responses are fortifying themselves against potential failure. They will say, "If Bob finishes his part, then I can do my part." They're laying the groundwork for a "no fault" excuse and for not finishing their work.
There are always alternatives, other routes, and ways to get the job done. Excuse makers usually have the energy of a slug and the spine of a jellyfish. You don't want them on your team when you're trying to climb Mt. Everest.
"Yes, but . . ."
This is another excuse. You might give your team members suggestions or solutions, and they come back to you with "Yes, but . . ." as a response. They don't really want answers, help, or solutions. You need to call the "Yes, but . . ." people out on their avoidance tactic by saying something like "You know, Jackie, every time I offer you a suggestion you say, 'Yes, but . . . ,' which makes me think you don't really want to solve this problem. That's not going to work. If you want to play the victim, go right ahead, but I'm not going to allow you to keep this up." After a response like that, you can be assured that the next words you hear will not be "Yes, but . . ."!
"I guess . . ."
This is usually said in a weak, soft-spoken, shoulder-shrugging manner. It's another attempt to shirk responsibility--a phrase that is muttered only when people half agree with you but want to leave enough leeway to say, "Well, I didn't really know. . . . I was only guessing." If you use this phrase, cut it out of your vocabulary.
"We'll see . . ."
How many times did we hear our parents say this? We knew they were buying time, avoiding a fight or confrontation, or really saying no. It's better to be decisive and honest by saying, "I need more information. Please present your case or send me the data--both pro and con--so I can make an informed decision." That way, the interested parties will contribute to an in-depth, well-researched "verdict."

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Vacancy in Finance and Administration

Dear All,

I represent an IT Company called Techno Brain Ltd (www.technobrainltd.com). Currently we are looking for a Project admin to join our office at Dar Es Salaam with experience in Finance and administration area. Please find the details below. If interested, request you to send the CVs to hr@technobrainltd.com on or before 20th May 2010. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted within 7 days of apllication.


Position :
Project Admin – Back Office Operations
Job Location: Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Job Code/ Email Contact :
BADMINDAR10 / hr@technobrainltd.com
Responsibility :


• Project and Resource Tracking on a day-to-day basis
• Reporting – Internal & External and managing alerts for slippage or any delivery issues.
• Experience in Maintaining track of Project expenses & Cost, payment etc
• On time Billing on rendered services
• Reviewing and approving timesheets
• Documentation & filing of all customer meetings, project deliverables
• Internal Quality Audits


Requirement :
CPA/ Bcom or any Graduate with 3 – 5 years of experience in an administrative role, preferably in IT industry.
Experience :
3 – 5 years of administrative experience in IT industry with exposure to various monitoring tools.
Desired skills :
Proficiency in using Microsoft Office Products.

The supposedly Obama's mistress

Roumors has it that the pictured above, Miss Vera Barker, the former Obama's finance Director in his 2004 senate campaign got involved with him in aWashington D.C Hotel.
Sasa sijui ni kweli au ni haters tu lol! They are the only ones who know the truth.

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Dont allow your toddler to watch too much TV.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Toddlers who watch too much TV may struggle in school later, with measurably lower scores in math, and they may get bullied more than other children, Canadian and U.S. researchers reported on Monday.Less surprisingly, children who watched more TV at age 2 weighed more by the time they were 10 and ate more snacks and soft drinks, the researchers reported in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine.

"The results support previous suggestions that early childhood television exposure undermines attention," wrote Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and colleagues at Bowling Green University in Kentucky and the University of Michigan.
They said children who spend more time watching TV and less time playing with other kids may lose valuable chances to learn social skills.
The researchers started with more than 2,000 children taking part in a larger study. Their parents reported how much TV the children watched at 2-1/2 and later at 4-1/2 year old.
The checked with the children's teachers and doctors when the subjects were 10.
Every additional weekly hour of television at 29 months corresponded to a 7 percent drop in classroom attention and a 6 percent drop in math skills, the researchers found.
An hour more TV a week as a toddler meant a child was 10 percent more likely to be bullied, exercised 13 percent less, weighed 5 percent more and ate 10 percent more snacks, they found.
"Despite clear, age-specific recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that discourage any screen media exposure during infancy and less than two hours per day beyond 2 years of age, parents show poor factual knowledge and awareness of such existing guidelines," the researchers wrote.
In their group, most of the children watched no more TV than this recommended amount but 11 percent watched more, they said.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox; editing by Chris Wilson) SOURCE; http://health.yahoo.com/news/reuters/us_children_tv.html

Yerooo hachezi mbali.

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Kitenge style


If you get the right colors, this style will rock!

And try these one

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Kazi, kazi, kazi

The Aga Khan University Institute for Educational Development, Eastern Africa, invites applications for the following position, based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. You are encouraged to inform all those who qualify for this position to apply.
1. EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE DIRECTOR’S OFFICE
Reporting to the Director, AKU-IED EA, the appointee will be responsible for providing effective and efficient administrative and secretarial support to the Director’s Office at AKU-IED EA. His or her specific duties will include
• Ensure effective and efficient functioning of the office of the Director.
• Provide briefing materials to the Director, management of information flow (email, verbal, written) and follow-up on deadlines and commitments made.
• Coordinate social and operational aspects of visits from official visitors to IED, and events hosted by IED (Graduation, Conferences, Seminars, Workshops) by:
• Maintain liaison with external agencies (e.g. donors, visiting faculty, partners, stakeholders) to ensure efficient follow-up and information-flow.
• Act as secretary to the Management Advisory Group and other committees where the Director is represented and may require assistance (note taking and transcribing, ensuring decisions made are implemented, circulation of notes and scheduling meetings).
• Liaise with the Administrative Assistant Director’s office in organisation and logistics of Director’s travel.
• Maintain office library and database of official contacts.
• Any other duties as requested by the Director.
The ideal candidate should posses a first degree in Public Administration or other related field from a recognised university and at least 3 years of secretarial experience at a senior level especially in an education setting. Other requirements include proficiency in Microsoft applications (Word, Excel, and Access) and ability to communicate effectively in both English and Kiswahili. The candidate must have excellent interpersonal and team building skills, evidence of taking initiative and a record of providing a friendly, efficient and supportive service. A diploma in secretarial skills will be an added advantage.


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Reporting to the Associate Director, Administration or nominee, the appointee will be responsible for providing effective and efficient administrative and secretarial support to the Associate Director, Administration and to Faculty at AKU-IED, EA. His or her specific duties will include.
• Scheduling of appointments and providing support on the daily tasks of supervisors (including organising documentation and resources for meetings or classes)
• Carrying out general office administration functions, which include maintaining and operating appropriate and efficient communications systems such as telephone, fax, email, mail and courier service and attending to day-to-day administrative issues
• Maintaining efficient systems to ensure all incoming and outgoing correspondence is properly received, recorded and distributed
• Maintaining efficient filing systems
• Taking minutes during meetings outlining recommendations and tasks assigned
• Liaising with the Administrative Assistants in general administration to follow-up on relevant arrangements e.g. transport or travel
• Ensuring proper travel arrangements and itineraries are made
• Maintaining task lists
• Assist with web-based and library research
• Any other duty as may be assigned by the Supervisor
The ideal candidate should hold a Bachelor’s degree in Secretarial Studies or equivalent and should have at least two years of related work experience. S/he should demonstrate initiative, strong interpersonal skills and should be proficient in the use of all MS Office applications as well as good communication skills.


Please send your application, an updated CV and testimonials, including the names, postal and e-mail addresses, telephone/fax numbers of two professional references, addressed to the Human Resources Coordinator, AKU - TIHE P.O. Box 125, Dar es Salaam; Fax (+255) (0)22 2150875 or email hr.iedea@aku.edu by May 12, 2010. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. For further information, please visit www.aku.edu

I am back

Jamani wapendwa wa blog hii, samahani kwa kutoweza kupost kitu chochote kwa muda wa takribani wiki 2. Kwa kweli ni kwa sababu za ukosekanaji wa technologia hii ya internet mahali nilipokuwa, na si tu internet bali hata simu ya mtandao wowote. Nilikuwa mahali hapo ambapo sitapataja kwa shughuli za kikazi hivyo sikuwa na la kufanya. Natumaini hamjatoweka na mtaendelea kunipa support.

Thank you na tuendelee kuelimishana.

Friday, April 9, 2010

Handbags available

Kuna handbags za kila aina, kila rangi, best quality maana hatuuzi za kichina. call 0784 703920 na utaletewa  ulipo. It is just 25,000 na unapendeza na kuwa unique

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Ten ways to manage Bad Bosses

  Hint: Treat them like toddlers

Do you ever think your boss behaves like a child going through the "terrible twos," throwing tantrums or reverting to a little lost lamb when in over his or her head?
I call this regression "Terrible Office Tyrant" (TOT) behavior. TOTs can act like schoolyard bullies afraid to reveal the slightest incompetence, or like helpless children. They can be fickle, stubborn or needy or have irrational fears. And they can consume your workday, not to mention wreak havoc on productivity and profits.
A bad economy, workplace pressures and stress can trigger the many striking similarities between bad bosses and terrible tykes. We're all human, and behind a boss's professional facade is often a grown kid who can't handle his or her power.
When your boss slips into any of the 10 classic TOT behaviors, including the "bratty" type (overly demanding, stubborn, self-centered or tantrum-throwing) or the "little lost lamb" variety (fickle or overly fearful), you can use proven parental techniques and actually thrive in your job. By seeing the childlike motives behind a boss's (or co-worker's) actions, you can better manage even the most difficult situations.


Use C.A.L.M.
The top four tips to keeping your office from being a corporate playpen are best described by the acronym C.A.L.M.: communicate, anticipate, laugh and manage up:


1. Communicate
Communicate frequently, openly and honestly. Savvy TOT-tamers take the initiative to establish an open dialogue. At work, stay aligned with your boss's objectives rather than focusing on your pet projects, so that your work remains consistent with what's most critical to management.
By bravely opening the dialogue, you'll also avoid misunderstandings with co-workers; other factors may be contributing to an ignored e-mail or seemingly unfriendly response, such as a tight deadline or pressure from the boss.


2. Anticipate
Be alert for problems and prepared with solutions. Offer answers to emerging issues; don't add to the pile of problems if you want to avoid triggering bad behavior. Your boss wants to delegate as much as possible -- as long as you make the process worry-free. Know when to stay away if you expect a tantrum is coming down the hall.


3. Laugh
Use humor, or what I call "the great diffuser" of tension, to break down interpersonal logjams. Laughter helps create bonds and reminds us of our larger purpose: to work together with upbeat, constructive energy. We can and should be able to accomplish great things as a team at work, while having some fun. Take the initiative to do this and watch the seething subside.


4. Manage up
Let yourself shine by being a problem-solver and collaborator. You can be a beacon of positive energy for your boss, co-workers and team. Part of managing up also means setting limits to bad behavior. Oftentimes TOTs are unaware of the effect of their actions. You can influence these actions, and your skills will be transferable to any job.


Advanced TOT-taming tips
Here are some specifics on how to tame your TOT and humanize your workplace. Try these time-honored "parenting" techniques:


5. Don't fight fire with fire
If your TOT is tantrum- or bully-prone, mirroring his childish behavior is a downward spiral. Avoid the temptation to win the battle and lose the war. Instead, calmly and concisely tell your boss how his or her actions affected you. Keep a matter-of-fact tone and be factual. Use "I" statements rather than "you" to avoid an accusatory demeanor.


6. Use positive and negative reinforcement
When bosses set aside their worst TOT traits, respond with gratitude and comment on how it inspires you to do your best. Praising positive actions is a powerful way to foster better behavior. Over time, your boss will link the better management style with positive employee morale and results. Remember, if there's something in it for your boss, you can effect change.


7. Know your timing
Timing can be everything, with a child or an office tyrant. Learn the best times of day to approach your boss. Study his or her patterns, mood swings and hot buttons and plan your interactions accordingly. It can make the difference between a pleasant "yes" and an irrevocable "no!" If you anticipate problems with solutions, you become indispensable.


8. Be a role model
Project the highest ethical standards and radiate positive energy. Maintain a balanced demeanor and approach each crisis (real or imagined) with a rational style. Your boss often needs a sounding board and you can be a valued voice of reason and calm when issues emerge.


9. Package your information well
Some TOTs can be frustrating when they're inattentive or unavailable. It can seem like a form of corporate ADD, or as I call it, BADD (boss attention deficit disorder). BADD bosses can't focus on important tasks and allow e-mails, text messages, phones and people to interrupt their (and your) flow.
Make sure you understand your boss's ideal communication method, package your work in an appealing way and make your presentations engaging and interactive. Make it irresistible for your boss to find out about your projects.

10. Set boundaries
Let bosses know privately when they've gone over the line, but do so diplomatically. Keep the conversation focused on your work product. If your manager is intentionally malicious, that's another matter that requires more serious action. If, after repeated efforts for cooperation (such as with a bully boss and unsupportive management), you may be best off looking elsewhere. You have to determine how much strife you can handle.

Suti za ukweli kama ya Mrs O, zinapatikana.

Just call 0784 703920 na utaletewa varieties uchague.

The Importance of Internships

Internship jamani, internship, wapeni vijana nafasi ya internship makazini kwenu, ni muhimu sana. cha kushangaza vijana wengi wanapata shida sana wanapokuwa wanatafuta nafasi hizi, kwa nini lakini? Kwanza ni free labor kampuni inapata, kwa nini msiwape nafasi ya kujifunza? Ni vizuri tukawafundisha watu wetu kazi ili kuwe na vijana wengi wenye uwezo wa kumudu kazi. We unafikiri hii ni sawa kuwanyima watu nafasi za Internship? Ingewezekana kila kampuni iwe imejiwekea utaratibu kwa mwaka kwa ajili ya kuajiri vijana kadhaa kwa ajili ya intership program.


Internships are known for giving students the opportunity to apply their knowledge in real world environments. At the same time, they will also develop skills which will help them perform better at their jobs.


Internships greatly increase the chances that a student will gain full time employment after graduation. In this article, we will look at internships, and how they can assist students in performing well at their jobs.
One problem commonly cited by employers is that many graduates do not have the practical skills necessary to excel in the job market. They also feel that the professionalism of students is less than it should be. Even though there are a large number of theories on how to encourage employees and increase profits, it is apparent that enhanced levels of education are not enough to prepare students for a real world environment. Being able to improve these weaknesses will make graduates much more effective in their careers.

By using internships, students are provided with experience that will make them stronger. In addition to this, their work ethic will increase, and they will be confident in their abilities. Internships will also allow students to learn about time management, discipline, and effective communication skills. In the business world, critical thinking skills are very important. Graduates must be able to make quick decisions which are based on logic. Internships will teach students how to excel in a large number of different organizations and industries. When students use internships, they will bring benefits to themselves as well as their employers.

Because many employers feel that some students lack the practical experience to excel in the real world, internships have become more important than ever before. Those who choose to participate in internships will be granted credits towards their graduation by many colleges. There are a variety of different companies which offer internships to students. These include corporations, non-profit organizations, and other institutions. When looking at internships, it is important to understand what employers want. A number of studies have shown that there are six attributes that employers are looking for.

These attributes are motivation, leadership, oral communication skills, experience, and interpersonal skills. There are a number of employees who naturally have these skills. However, it should be noted that most employees don't have these traits, and they must be taught. When students go through mentoring programs, they must learn to problem solve and communicate effectively. In addition to this, it is also important to know how to use different forms of media and technology. When looking at the effectiveness of internships, it is also crucial to look at case studies.

Source: http://www.exforsys.com/career-center/internship-tips/the-importance-of-internships.html

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Vacancy at TLS (SAJEA Project)

Deputy Director Position

For the Program Support Office of the Strengthening Access to Justice in Eastern Africa (SAJEA) Program
Background:
The Canadian Bar Association (CBA) and the law societies of East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda) are implementing phase 1 a CIDA funded program: Strengthening Access to Justice in Eastern Africa Program (SAJEA). The SAJEA Program brings together key legal sector stakeholders, including judges, government and civil society organizations to work together collaboratively to advance access to justice nationally and regionally.
The CBA has established a Program Support Office (PSO) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania hosted by the Tanganyika Law Society. The PSO provides ongoing technical assistance to the National Working Groups (NWGs), comprised of key stakeholders in each country, and the Regional Advisory Group (RAG) established under the Program to facilitate and support the collaboration and coordination of key stakeholders in legal reform initiatives under this Program. This includes supporting the stakeholders in the implementation of their work plans for the program and institutional capacity development, sharing best practices on access to justice initiatives from the programming countries, Canada and internationally, and assisting with program reporting and monitoring. The PSO will facilitate the linkages among the Canadian Advisory Committee, the RAG and NWGs; with the sector-wide legal reform programmes; with other development partners; and, legal development projects. Additionally, the PSO will provide limited secretariat support for the RAG and NWGs to assist with the organization of meetings, trainings, activities. Please see www.cba.org/SAJEA/ for more information on the Program.
Responsibilities:
The Deputy Director will be employed under the auspices of the Tanganyika Law Society and will work closely with and report to the SAJEA Regional Director (Canadian lawyer) to:
• support and work with the NWGs, RAG and Program partners
• Attend meetings of the NWGs and RAG and provide substantive and logistical support as required
• Assist the NWGs in the development, coordination and implementation of their initiatives, and substantive issues
• Assist in the implementation of program activities: forums, trainings, workshops, etc. as necessary
• Monitor legislation and law reform initiatives in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda
• Share substantive knowledge of legal reform and access to justice
• Develop and maintain effective contacts within key legal sector institutions and stakeholders
• Provide logistical support to visiting Canadian technical resource personnel
• Assist in the preparation of reports
• Assist in the preparation of communication materials to the stakeholders, CIDA, public
• Assist with monitoring outcome of Program activities, initiatives and advise on follow-up responses
• Assist the Regional Director in any other duties as assigned
Qualifications:
Minimum Education Requirements
• LLB or JD degree from an accredited university
Minimum Experience Requirements
• Minimum of 3 years of relevant work experience
• Experience in public or private sector legal practice, or related experience, in Kenya, Tanzania or Uganda
• Experience working with legal sector institutions, including civil society organizations
• Research and policy experience
Desirable Experience Requirements
• Experience with legal sector reform
• Experience working and effecting change in an institutional context
• Demonstrated knowledge and experience in access to justice issues
• Experience with donor-funded programs, program management and budget oversight
• Experience in government or NGO advocacy
Skills, Knowledge and Abilities
• Knowledge of government legislative and policy-making processes
• Strong knowledge of the East Africa region required
• Professional level oral and written English communication skills required.
• Knowledge of local languages an advantage
• High level of professionalism and attention to detail
• Diplomacy, tact, political acumen
• Ability to work with and represent the Program with national partners at the highest levels
• Understanding of personal computers and related software applications, in particular e-mail, word processing, database and spreadsheet software (MS Office)
• Ability to articulate the Program’s vision
• Creativity, innovativeness and flexibility
• Cultural sensitivity
• Ability to work under pressure as circumstances dictate
 Availability for weekend meetings and flexible hours as necessary
• Ability to travel to the programming countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda).
The Deputy Director will be based out of the PSO, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. This position is a one year contract with possibility of extension subject to funding. Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Please send cover letter, detailed cv, writing sample and references to:

Strengthening Access to Justice in Eastern Africa (SAJEA)
Program Support Office (PSO)
c/o Tanganyika Law Society Plot 299 Ada Estate,P.O. Box 2148, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: (255 22) 266 4254 Fax: (255 22) 266 4253
E-mail: sajeapso@gmail.comAttention: Ms Jennifer Khor, Regional Director
Preference is for applications to be sent by e-mail. Applications MUST be RECEIVED by April 22, 2010, 5:00 pm.

Mambo ya Pasaka kwa Obama



First family at the White House's annual Easter Egg Roll, which means one thing: PARTY! Entertainment

Rais akielekea kwenye tukio na secretary wake

Mama naye akiingia na binti yake sasha

mabinti wa obama wakiwakilisha- Haka kakubwa kanakua hako, na ni karembo sana lol!

mother and daughter happy moment!

The ever "humble" Obama playing with kids

Monday, April 5, 2010

The Importance of Self-discipline

Hii article nimeitoa hubpages.com ikiwa ni original work ya Napoleon Hill "Think & Grow Rich" Part 6 - SELF-DISCIPLINE na nikaona ina mambo ya muhimu sana kwa mtu yeyote anayetaka ku-achieve success fulani kwenye maisha, iwe kazini, kwenye biashara au hata shuleni. Ni self discpline, yani ile namna ya kujipangia na kutekeleza shughuli zako bila kusimamiwa na mtu au sheria. Hasa makazini hii ni muhimu sana maana you always stand out of the crowd kwa kuwa everything you do is planned.

Self-discipline is hard work. People who get the job done, even when the job is unpleasant, have developed a mental toughness that comes from practice, patience, and the ability to see beyond the immediate task.

Self-Discipline in Your Personal Life
Self-discipline involves doing what needs to be done rather than what you would like to do. Here are some guidelines.
1. Take responsibility for yourself. You are responsible for managing your own life. You alone have the power to fulfill those goals you have set for yourself. Take responsibility for meeting those goals by taking action.
2. Review your priorities. Even highly disciplined persons find it easy to get off track. If you don't know where you're going, it doesn't matter what route you take or when you get there. Periodic review of your priorities will keep you focused.
3. Start small. If many areas of your life seem chaotic or unmanageable, then start working on one area and ignore the others for now.
The key is to get started! Once you start, you'll develop momentum, and the task won't seem so hard.
4. Reward yourself. Discipline should not be drudgery. After tackling an especially difficult task, reward yourself. Even an anticipated brief break from an unpleasant chore can provide the proverbial carrot on the stick to press on.


Discipline on the Job
Here are guidelines for self-discipline to make your organization or business successful.
1. Set an example. Business owners and managers cannot expect their employees to practice self-discipline if they don't set an example. Moreover, disciplined employees inspire one another to be their best.
2. Focus on specific goals. The key to self-discipline is being able to defer your gratification from the present to the future. The best gratification comes when you realize your goals.
3. Identify time-wasters. Some examples of time-wasters include not organizing your telephone time (when you return calls, when you make calls), giving in to distractions (visitors, getting coffee, etc.), and attending poorly organized, unproductive meetings. Also, look for ways to reduce paperwork.
4. Work smart. Some strategies for working smart include:
• Planning ahead.
• Organizing projects into manageable segments.
• Scheduling demanding work at peak performance times
Exercising self-discipline is the key to achieving your personal and professional goals.


Success map
Sometimes discipline is easier if it is structured around a system. Try one of the following systems to achieve your goals and master improvements.
1. Purchase a notebook and incorporate the exercise sheets from this book; organize with tabs/dividers in the notebook. You will need a section for the following things:
• Calendar.
• To-do lists (one for personal, one for professional).
• Ideas and goals.
• Wish list.
• Phone numbers/addresses.
2. Another option is a programmed time-management system, e.g., calendar, daily to-dos. Personalize this system, too, by adding your personal affirmation statements, goals, and visual reminders. This system will serve as a motivator to keep you on track, on time, and focused on success daily.
3. Computer software is now available to help with time man agement. If computer work is part of your daily routine, this might be an important aid to discipline. However, be careful. It is also easy to waste time on computers.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Roumors has it that Diva Beyonce is pregnant

Happy couple waiting for their bundle of joy
March 25, 2010. It's been a long time waiting . . . but now it's finally happened. MediaTakeOut.com just learned from a ROCK SOLID source that legendary singer Beyonce and her hip hop mogul husband Jay Z are expecting their first child together.

According to our source Beyonce is doing fine and resting (for now), but she's expected to continue working throughout her pregnancy. And we're also told that Jay Z is EXTREMELY happy to be having his first child with Bey.
Beyonce has spoken about the hard work of having a baby, having watched her younger sister Solange marry and have a son while she was still a teenager.
If it's true, congrats! If not, nevermind!
The pair have been married almost two years and she's coming off a world tour.

Feel stressed at work? Do this..............

Ricky Martin has confirmed he is gay- kazi ipo

Hatimae ameamua kusema ukweli kwamba yeye si ridhki.


While it was widely known that he had a liking for the guys, Ricky Martin has finally officially announced that he's gay.


The "Livin' La Vida Loca" hitmaker has often been the subject of gay rumors - fueling speculation in 2008 when he adopted twin baby boys, Matteo and Valentino, born to a surrogate mother.

Coming out of the closet via a message on his Web site, Martin wrote, "A few months ago I decided to write my memoirs, a project I knew was going to bring me closer to an amazing turning point in my life."

"From the moment I wrote the first phrase I was sure the book was the tool that was going to help me free myself from things I was carrying within me for a long time. Things that were too heavy for me to keep inside. Writing this account of my life, I got very close to my truth. And this is something worth celebrating."
While many close to Ricky have advised him against the full confession, the singer admits, "Allowing myself to be seduced by fear and insecurity became a self-fulfilling prophecy of sabotage. Today I take full responsibility for my decisions and my actions."

He adds, "These years in silence and reflection made me stronger and reminded me that acceptance has to come from within and that this kind of truth gives me the power to conquer emotions I didn't even know existed. What will happen from now on? It doesn't matter. I can only focus on what's happening to me in this moment. The word 'happiness' takes on a new meaning for me as of today. It has been a very intense process. Every word that I write in this letter is born out of love, acceptance, detachment and real contentment. Writing this is a solid step towards my inner peace and vital part of my evolution. I am proud to say that I am a fortunate homosexual man. I am very blessed to be who I am."

Monday, March 29, 2010

Vibweka vya Dubai

Vijana hawajawahi kuona ch**i jamani, wala vivazi vinavyomuacha mwanamke wazi, so wanashangaa na kutamani hata kubaka picha.


Imagine mwanao katoka home kwenda shopping , anafika huko ndo anazubaa hivyo. Anyway, sharia zinasaidia i guess.

Office gossip; Ni lazima sana kuendekeza umbea kazini?

This is a major problem at workplaces. You will hear in the corridors "have you heard the latest" so and so are doing this and that........ ili mradi tu umbea. Hebu nitumieni maoni yeu, do you think gossiping is a necessarry evil? is it possible to work in a gossip free environment? Do we need to put in place anti-gossip strategies. Just asses yourself: Have you seen gossip used as a weapon in your office? Have the effects been positive or negative? Do you enjoy gossip, or do you try to discourage it?


See how you can discourage gossip at workplaces
Step 1.
Stop at-work chit chat by halting a conversation that is headed in a gossipy direction. Try lines such as, "Let's hold off talking about Sheila until she's here," or "This not something I feel comfortable talking about with Peter in the next room." Your co-workers will be caught off-guard, but chances are they will change the subject.



Step 2
Announce the possibility that email correspondence may be recorded. Large companies perform random checks of at-work email, and this tactic can be very effective at eliminating office gossip. True, coworkers can still talk in the break room, but that's a much riskier move than spreading gossip via people's inboxes.


Step 3
Remind yourself and others that participating in gossip ruins credibility. Although coworkers may come to you for gossip, they certainly won't come to you with a serious secret or when they are in need of trusted business advice. Unfortunately, gossip goes on your invisible resume and may slow the speed at which you achieve career goals.


Step 4
Attack gossip indirectly by working toward a tighter knit community. Humans are naturally petty and self-centered, but gossip is much more likely to occur when coworkers are not getting along. If you have the luxury of working in a small or medium-sized office, create an environment that brings out the best in everyone. You'll see the gossip greatly reduced. In larger, more corporate offices, this is a difficult feat. Bring in professionals for community-building events or demand that everyone attend an office retreat.


 Step 5
Shut your own mouth. A surefire way to put a stop to office gossip is to take yourself out of the game entirely. When your mouth is shut, you can't dish it out and you can't take it. Coworkers will respect your ability to rise above the small talk and hopefully follow suit.

Tips & Warnings
Some managers take the risky, yet effective approach of confronting a gossiping employee. After discussing the problems with at-work chatter and offering disciplinary action, the manager uses the office gossip as feedback and constructive criticism for himself and the rest of the staff. This is very difficult to do in a tactful way that doesn't hurt anyone's feelings, but if it can be done well, it is a great tactic.If gossip gets to the point where it is creating a destructive office environment, consider threatening employees with a suspension or dismissal on the grounds of breach of confidentiality. It is hard to prove that gossip is destructive and idle threats aren't always the best idea, but in extreme situations, this may prove effective.Unless you happen to work in a mature, loving environment with a staff of self-aware and generous people

Remember Brandy of the famous Moesha TV show....

Brandy films scenes for her new VH1 reality show, "Brandy and Ray J: A Family Business."


Brandy takes a hike


A camera crew follows the singer and her friend for her new VH1 reality show, "Brandy and Ray J: A Family Business," which will premiere on April 11.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

How to deal with conflicts at workplaces

Friction in the workplace can be stressful and counterproductive for everyone involved. Learn to approach the person with whom you are struggling and resolve the situation. Follow these few steps to alleviate awkwardness in the workplace.

1. Decide whether you want to confront the person who is bothering you. It is usually better to air grievances in the open than to let them fester.
2. Step 2
Speak to the other person calmly, politely and rationally. Focus on the situation and facts, avoiding gossip and personal attacks.
3. Step 3
Be careful not to express hostility in your posture, facial expression or tone. Be assertive without being aggressive.
4. Step 4
Listen to the other person carefully: What is she trying to say? Be sure you understand her position.
5. Step 5
Express interest in what the other person is saying. You can acknowledge her ideas without necessarily agreeing or submitting. Saying, "I understand that you feel this way. Here's how I feel..." acknowledges both positions.
6. Step 6
Communicate clearly what you want, offering positive suggestions and recommendations. Be willing to be flexible.
7. Step 7
Speak to your supervisor if a problem with a difficult co-worker seriously threatens your work, but avoid whining.


Tips & Warnings


• Deal with problematic personalities by trying to understand what motivates their behavior, then tailoring your actions to work with that personality type. Once you grasp why people behave as they do, you will be able to interact with them more effectively.


• For example, be firm with bullies at work ' don't allow them to pressure you into doing anything unwanted. Be forceful in your opinions, but act with a bit of caution.


• Around complainers, avoid acting too sympathetic if you feel their complaints are ill-founded; instead, ask what sorts of actions they plan to take to change the situation. Squarely ask th

Friday, March 26, 2010

How about watching this movie over the weekend

Huku makazini kuna vijimambo sana hasa kwa wale wenye ndoa zenu. Kuna temptations za hali ya juu, so nimeona nisuggest movie yenye mafundisho unayoweza kuangalia kama learning experience.
Inaitwa Obsessed. Imekuwa directed na Steve Shill, na kuchezwa na Idris Elba, Beyonce Knowles, na Ali Larter. Hope you would learn something

A successful asset manager, who has just received a huge promotion, is blissfully happy in his career and in his marriage. But when a temp worker starts stalking him, all the things he's worked so hard for are placed in jeopardy

Job opportunity

Marketing Coordinator

SabaSeven is looking for a highly effcicient and creative individual to act as a marketing liaison in the setting up and execution of our marketing strategy.
The qualified individual will work closely with the Marketing Executive and our regional affiliates in the implementation of this strategy.
This individual is expected to be highly professional, in manner and appearance, and ready to serve the company to the fullest, including periodically travelling to different regions for promotional and other purposes.

Other responsibilities include:
Search for the market for our products and services
Designs, negotiates, and buys advertising in local media
Spread the word about the company and our services through networking, and initiates media opportunities including on-air interviews and feature stories
Set up promotion teams for circulating fliers, t-shirts and brochures

Set up distribution centers in different regions
Negotiates, on behalf of the company, for distribution rights with African artists and publishers (in music, film, books, etc.)
Design a transportation mechanism for efficient and quick ways for products to reach consumers
Writes and distributes press releases
Build and maintain database of important contacts
Constantly analyze the market for new openings that can be explored, and report the findings through periodic reporting to the Marketing Executive
Qualifications and Experience:
Must have Form VI Secondary Certificate or higher, preferably in Computer or Business-related fields
Strong interpersonal skills
Good qualifications in Kiswahili and English, verbal and written
Knowledge in Computer, especially MS Word and Internet
Strong organizational and management skills (problem-solving and time management)
Ability to analyze, understand and discuss new marketing designs
To apply:


Applications outlining relevant qualifications, printed C.V. with names of three (3) references and your contact telephone number(s), e-mail, and/or mailing address. Applicants must send a passport size and/or full photograph of themselves and must clearly indicate their salary proposal in their application.

Applications should be sent by BOTH email and mail to the attention of:
Marketing Executive
SabaSeven
P.O.BOX 53
Coram, NY 11727
ppr@SabaSevenWorld.com


P.S This position must be filled immediately. The first contract will be of 6-12 months, with possible extention upon review. The post is in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania but regular travelling to our distribution centers is expected. This position will eventually become permanent. The qualified candidate, will also have a chance to earn a small stake in the company at the end of the first contract depending on performance.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Je biashara yako haina direction? Je unataka ku invest Bongoland? Waone hawa

OKOA Business Programme

Rescue and revive your business now!!
Statistics show that more than 80% of new businesses fail in their first five (5) years of operation, what does this mean? There is a huge gap of mechanisms to sustain the business beyond five years, what are you doing about this?
Are your cash outflows exceeding your inflows already? Do you remember the last time you made a good sale? Have you been in business for a few years now and cannot see any progress? Have you begun selling your assets? STOP.
Are you beginning to experience sleepless nights? Are your creditors giving you hard time? Does your bank call you every week? DON’T GIVE UP.
It is time to make a decision to see the rescue experts and revive your business.
OKOA Business Programme is a rescue programme that aims at rescuing and reviving businesses which are in the stage of underperforming (profits decreasing), or distress (losses accruing) or crisis (final stage before bankruptcy).


                 and also.............................

DiasporaINVEST Point

Create Wealth through Remittances Today’
DiasporaINVEST Point is a business service aimed at promoting and assisting Tanzanians living in diaspora to come and invest in Tanzania.
What does DiasporaINVEST Point do?
Assisting Tanzanians living in diaspora to invest back home and provide support for community development.
How do we do it?
We provide a platform where we can identify you, your interests, and steps to do it.
How best do we do it?
We use the best model that is reliable, timely, efficient and affordable.
The best and safest way to invest your money and knowledge is to do it in your motherland.
So join the point today by sending us your details that include your full name, the country you are living, contact details, your profession/experience, as well as your interests/needs.
Send your details through our email address.


Contact us for more information
Sustainable Solutions Consultancy
P.O BOX 452
Dar es Salaam
Mobile: 255 786 092920
Email: diaspora@ssc.co.tz
Website: www.ssc.co.tz

Ajali iliyotokea leo alfajiri kibamba

Watu saba waliokuwa kwenye Hiace wamefariki hapo hapo baaada ya lori la mafuta lililokuwa linatoka Dar kwenda pwani kuigonga hiace na kuiburuza hadi mtaroni ambapo iliilalia.


Hakuna hata mmoja aliyetoka kama unavyoona kwenye picha.



Ni maiti mbili tu zikiwa vipande ndo zimetolewa na zingine bado maana kazi ya kulitoa hilo lori ngumu ukizingatia lina petroli.
Wafiwa wote poleni sana na waliofikwa na umauti Mungu awarehemu. Amen.

Is your boss a pain in the neck? see How To Deal With A Difficult Boss

Summary: Bosses and supervisors aren't from another planet, but sometimes they seem to be. If you deal with the boss from hell you know. Conflict between a difficult boss and an employee can be daunting and intimidating. Here are some tips to help you deal with difficult bosses and supervisors.

________________________________________

Most people at some point in their lives have to deal with a difficult boss. Difficult supervisors vary in personality from being a little pushy or rude, all the way to being downright abusive. Many people feel that an abusive boss has control of their personal life outside of work by lowering their self-esteem and making them live in constant fear. The role of a supervisor sometimes attracts certain controlling-type personalities because they crave the power it gives them and because they lack such control in their own personal lives. A supervisor has complete control over your most basic human needs—your ability to put food on the table and a roof over your head. These are powerful motivating factors that allow a difficult supervisor to control people out of fear of losing these basic needs. We may not be able to always correct their behavior, but we should never have to live in fear and let our difficult boss control our lives.


Here are some strategies on handling a difficult boss situation.

1. Always have a plan B. Most people are scared about having a discussion with their boss concerning their abusive behavior because they fear reprimand or losing their job as a result of it. Their fear is usually justified if the supervisor is a control-freak and feels that their subordinate is threatening their control. Before you deal with any type of conflict, you always need to have a plan B in case things don’t work out. A plan B is the best alternative that you can come up without having to negotiate anything with your boss. In this type of scenario, your best plan B would probably take the form of having an actual job offer in hand with another employer before you have your talk. By not having a back-up plan, you have given your abusive boss even more leverage over you because they know you have no where else to go. Having a plan B, however, empowers you with the ability to walk-away at any time should the negotiation not go right. Increase your power and have a plan B before you deal with the conflict.


2. Never react to verbal abuse or harsh criticism with emotion. This will always get you into more trouble than you started with because it will become a war between egos and chances are good that your boss has a bigger ego than you have—hence why he is difficult in the first place. When a personal attack is made on you, they are trying to bait you into reacting emotionally because once you react, you become an easy target for additional attacks. The key then is not to react, but to acknowledge and move on. By doing this, you effectively strip all of the power behind their verbal attacks away from your abusive boss, without creating conflict. If your boss happens to be an intimidator or a control freak, then the best way of dealing with their behavior is to remain calm and acknowledge their power by saying, "You're right, I'm sorry." By saying this, you take away any chance of them lashing back at you because you have sidestepped their verbal attack rather than meeting it head on.


3. Discuss rather than confront. When your boss criticizes you, don’t react out of emotion and become confrontational with them about it because that just breeds more conflict. Instead, use their criticism as a topic for discussion on interests, goals, and problem-solving and ask them for their advice. If they criticize your work, then that means that they have their own idea on how that work should be done, so ask them for their advice on how your work can be improved.


4. Manage the manager. A source of conflict usually occurs when a group of employees gets a new manager who demands that things run differently. These changes are usually reactionary in nature because the employees go about their regular duties until the manager comes by and criticizes the way it is being done. Instead of waiting for their criticism, take a proactive approach and be absolutely clear from the very beginning on how your boss wants things to be done so that there is no miscommunication later on. There are many ways of completing a task and having a discussion about them at the very beginning will allow you to see things from their perspective as well as sharing your own with them. Get to know their likes and dislikes inside and out so that you can avoid future criticisms.


5. Know that you can do little to change them. Being a difficult person is part of their personality and therefore it is a very difficult, if not impossible thing to change in a supervisor, so don’t think that you can change how they act. Instead, change the way that you view their behavior. Don’t label them as being a jerk--just merely label them as your boss. By avoiding derogatory labeling, you avoid making it easy on yourself to be angry with your boss.


6. Keep your professional face on. Know the difference between not liking your boss and not being professional. You don’t have to make your boss your friend or even like your boss as a person, but you do have to remain professional and get the job done and carry out their instructions dutifully as a subordinate, just as you would expect them to be professional as do their duties as a supervisor.


7. Evaluate your own performance. Before you go attacking your boss, examine your own performance and ask yourself if you are doing everything right. Get opinions from other coworkers about your performance and see if there is any warrant to the criticisms of your supervisor before you criticize their opinions.


8. Gather additional support. If others share in your concern, then you have the power of numbers behind you to give you additional persuasion power over your boss. It is often easy for a supervisor to ignore or attack one employee, but it becomes more difficult to attack all of his employees. He might be able to fire one of you, but he will look like an idiot (and probably get fired himself) if he tries to fire all of you. An interdepartment union is a good way of mustering power against an abusive employer.


9. Don’t go to up the chain of command unless it’s a last resort. Going straight up the chain of command is not an effective way of dealing with a difficult supervisor because it only increases conflict in the workplace. Your immediate supervisor will consider this a very serious backstabbing maneuver and might seek some sort of retribution in the future against you and your career. Also, other people in your workplace might brand you as a whistleblower because of your actions. Try to discuss issues with your supervisor first and only go up the chain of command as a last resort.


10. Encourage good behavior with praise. It is easy to criticize your superiors, but criticisms often lead towards resentment and hostile feelings. Everyone likes a pat on the back for good behavior, so you should strive to watch for good behaviors from your supervisor and compliment them on that. Proactive praising is much more effective than reactive criticisms.


11. Document everything. If you choose to stay with a toxic employer, then document everything. This will become your main ammunition should a complaint ever be filed down the road. Document interactions with them as well as your own activities so that you can remind them of your own achievements at performance review time.


12. Leave work at work. Get into the habit of leaving work at home and not bringing it into your personal life because that will only add to your level of stress. Keep your professional life separate from your personal life as best as you can. This also includes having friends who you don’t work with so that you can detach yourself from your work life rather than bringing it home with you.


Tristan Loo is an experienced negotiator and an expert in conflict resolution. He uses his law enforcement experience to train others in the prinicples of defusing conflict and reaching agreements. Visit his website at http://www.streetnegotiation.com